• Sohaila Mosbeh

Pre Prototype?

Class 03- Laser


For this weeks laser cutting assignment I decided to a miniature prototype of my pcom final project just to figure out how will I be able to build that monster, and just as I predicted it still requires some adjustments done.


Inspiration: Shibari Technique, originated in Japan around the 1600s it was a rope tying technique used on prisoners so they can not escape. Now used in many artistic expressions of the how rope can be tied together to form eye catching patterns. Concept: Exploring the expression of vulnerability, what does it mean to relinquish control and submit to emotional expression.

Materials : Mat Board and Rope

Much like my previous projects I started off with alot of sketches of what the object might do or look like.

Second step, another quick dirty prototype of what the object looks like and how it will move.


After a quick test, I went back to do some iterations of some sketches of the redesign.

Next is the rhino modeling instead of drawing from scratch on illustrator.

After settling on the design on rhino, it was time to laser the miniature prototype.


Before laying out my material, I did a test run with a random piece of cardboard first. With a few kinks in the printing process out of the way it was time to place my material and then begin construction.

Reflections

There is a lot of adjustments that need to be made when it comes to stabilizing it. Since this instillation piece is suspended, what I did not account for is support for the bottom circular piece. I thinking that it need to be weighed down somehow so when the top plans move it does not shift around and hit the user inside. The second adjustment is the ropes, I need to remap how they weave into each other smoothly while wrapping the user within that action. Finally the kaleidoscope gobo part it's main function now is just projecting light down on the user, but maybe it can be the main component that moves all the ropes. I will continue 3D model the piece along with figuring out the motorized components.

© 2018 by Sohaila Mosbeh.